Game of Thrones Wrap-Up: The Pack Survives, and the Starks May Win the Game

Starks

SPOILERS for Game of Thrones season 7.

 

In winter, the lone wolf dies, but the pack survives.

And who would have guessed a few seasons ago that the strongest “pack” on Game of Thrones would be the Starks? Think about it. The Tyrells and the Martells are all dead, the Arryns and the Baratheons and the Tullys nearly so. Even the Lannisters are so decimated and fractured at this point that their strength may never recover. Jaime may never be able to pull away from Cersei completely, but as of the finale, he no longer seems to support her unchecked megalomania.

Meanwhile, the Starks have only grown stronger this season, as we saw in the finale. The show’s been playing on the rift between Sansa and Arya, and Bran’s apparent apathy toward the whole thing. But it was all a ruse to trap Littlefinger at his own game. Littlefinger’s own pretty, deceptive words came back to bite him in the end.

And with a bewildered face that has already launched 1,000 memes, Game of Thrones‘ most manipulative character has been removed from the game board. Chaos is a ladder, indeed. And sometimes people fall off.

But I think what’s important here is how Sansa and Arya have learned from their parents’ mistakes. Littlefinger’s machinations tore their mother and aunt apart and ultimately led to both their deaths. Sansa, Arya–and yes, even Bran–stood together, and took down one of their most formidable opponents.

(As for Bran…I’ve about halfway forgiven him from his season-long arc of douchiness that led to me calling for his death just a few days ago. When it counted, he stood with his family. It still doesn’t justify all of his behavior, but I’ll give him some credit.)

Each of the Stark children bring unique skills to the table: Sansa’s political savvy, Arya’s badass assassin training, Bran’s Three-Eyed Raven abilities. Apart, none of them could win this game, but together, they’ve really come into their own.

And we can’t forget about Jon Snow. We may have confirmation now that Jon is Aegon Targaryen, but his loyalties have always been to the Starks. (Jon really showed how much he takes after his adoptive father in the finale when he refused to pledge his loyalty to Cersei–a move that would have been politically savvy, but would have betrayed the oath he’d just made to Dany in the previous episode.)

Jon remains King in the North, and he’s forged a powerful alliance with Daenerys Targaryen. Of course, he’s put himself in a fraught position, both because the Northern lords are unlikely to accept Dany as their queen, and because he’s Dany’s nephew. Putting the ick factor of their incestuous relationship aside, Jon now has a better claim to the Iron Throne than Dany does. Jon is one of the few characters on the show that’s never wanted power; the power he’s gained has been pretty much thrust upon him. The same can’t be said for Dany. She wants the Iron Throne badly, and Jon is a threat.

But even with Dany’s armies and dragons, she’s going to have a hard time going up against the combined strength of the Stark clan. Let’s hope that Dany remembers that Jon Snow is not “just a bastard.” Whatever Jon’s DNA might say, he’s a Stark at heart, and the Starks have learned the one thing that the rest of the great families have failed to master: that they’re stronger together than alone.

 

Beth Woodward is the author of the contemporary fantasy novel, The Demon Within (Amazon; Barnes and Noble). The sequel, Embracing the Demon, will be released in March 2018.

 

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